Eating and Shopping in Paris

Shopping in Paris

Shopping in Paris

The French capital is of course considered one of the most important cities on the planet when it comes to fashion. The city is packed with great shops, and you can dress nicely in all price ranges. They can do this in France, and even people with tight budgets often dress very fashionably and elegantly, without it costing the white out of the eye.

According to Digopaul, Paris is also a very good city to look for antiques in, or delicacies, wine and other exclusive goods.

You will find plenty of shops in every district and district, but some areas stand out for their good shopping opportunities. Here is a selection:

  • Faubourg Saint-Honoré– This district is considered the heart of Paris when we talk about everything that is exclusive and trendy. Here you will find such as Versace, YSL, Hermes, Prada and Armani. Also stop by Boulevard Haussmann where you will find the magazines Galeries Lafayette and Printemps.
  • Champs-Elysées– In the main street of Paris are the exclusive shops in a row. This is where you go if Louis Vuitton and Chanel are on the shopping list. Between these shops there are large magazines and shopping centers.
  • Avenue Montaigne– The avenue is also very good for shopping, and a natural turn once you have considered the shops on the Champs-Elysées. The streets meet at the roundabout where the Franklin D. Roosevelt Subway Station is located.
  • Marais– Here you will find the latest in stores with well-known and exclusive brands, good shops for accessories and shoes, as well as many exciting vintage shops. In the Marais you will also find many good shops for antiques, jewelry, perfumes, art and delicacies.
  • Les Halles– In the area around Les Halles you will find large department stores and malls, as well as the larger chain stores, interspersed with small and trendy stores with designer clothes. Also head to Rue de Rivoli if you take the trip to Les Halles. There you will find much of the same, in addition to chain stores such as H&M, antique shops and art galleries.
  • Rue Cler– In Arrondissement 7 is Rue Cler. This is a gem for those who want to shop for delicacies in a little more comfort. The street is like an open marketplace, and most things take place outdoors as long as the weather allows. Most of Rue Cler is car-free, the street is paved with cobblestones, the shops are inviting, and the cafes are very cozy.

Eating in Paris

French cuisine is known for good food, and in a big city like Paris it is no problem to arrange a good meal. Restaurants abound in all neighborhoods, and in all price ranges. The city is also known for its exclusive restaurants, many of which are featured in the famous Michelin guide. As mentioned, Arrondissement 11 is a very popular area for those who love good food, but you will find plenty of good restaurants elsewhere as well. Several of the districts have delicious food from other corners of the world, especially from the countries of the Middle East and North Africa.

Eating in Paris

Taste experiences you should bring with you to Paris

  • Sweets– The French are completely raw on everything that destroys the diet. Stop by the bakeries or patisseries and buy some macaroons, lemon tart, eclairs, croissants, pains au chocolat, profiteroles (water cakes), or a delicious piece of cake. Eat crepes (jam-thin pancakes) in fast food that you can find everywhere, eat creme brulee in the restaurants, and taste the chocolates in their own chocolate shops (chocolatiers).
  • Baguette– In Paris, they take pride in baking the best possible baguettes, and as a baker, you can actually win the right to be a supplier to the Presidential Palace every year. Baguettes with delicious toppings are sold everywhere. Bring one or two to a park, perhaps with a bottle of good wine, and you will have a real Parisian lunch.
  • Croque-monsieur– In cafes and brasseries you should taste a croque-monsieur, preferably for lunch. This is a sandwich full of ham and cheese, with bechamel sauce between the layers. The sandwich is then sharpened in the oven, so that the loaf turns golden brown and the cheese flows down the sides. Also try a croque madame. It is a monsieur with a fried egg on top.
  • Cheese– Stop by a cheese shop and taste the cheeses. In Paris you can eat cheeses you have never heard of, and which are so good that you can become addicted. Feel free to choose a cheese shop where you can sit down at a table, order a plate of miscellaneous, preferably with a glass of wine next to it.
  • Choucroute– In the brasseries in France, Choucroute is often served, a casserole with a stuffing guarantee, and which is excellent for sharing. Originally a dish from the Alsace region, it also has strong ties to Paris. The word means sauerkraut (which is included in the stew), but the dish is dominated by sausages, pork bones and duck. This is often seasoned with fresh herbs and garlic.
  • Steak Frites– This is a typical Parisian dish that you will find in any self-respecting brasserie. Everyone has their own variations when it comes to the sauce, but basically we are talking about a piece of meat steak along with french fries. If you want something as an accessory, haricot verts (Kenya beans) are the right choice.
  • Duck confit– A confit is what you get when you heat-treat the raw material in fat over a long period of time, and with a low temperature. Duck confit is thighs that are fried on this appear in its own fat. The result is extremely tasty. The thighs get a delicious and crispy skin, while the meat becomes so tender that it often falls off the bone. Next to that you eat sarladaises, potatoes sautéed in even more duck fat, and added large amounts of garlic.
  • Escargots– Try eating snails when in Paris. Escargots are often eaten as an appetizer, cooked in chicken stock or wine, and added large amounts of garlic butter. If you are reluctant, you can think of this: In France, about 50 thousand tons of snails are eaten every year, and no one has died on it yet. In addition, snails are rich in protein and vitamins, while being lean on fat.
  • Cuisse de grenouilles– They also eat known frog legs in France, but the dish is not as common as, for example, snails. Frog legs are cooked in many different ways, but are perhaps best when fried or grilled. Try Provencal thighs, seasoned with fresh herbs and fresh tomatoes.